Archive for the ‘book club’ Category

The Innovator’s Mindset

October 23, 2017

“Innovation starts not by providing answers but by asking questions.” – George Couros

The Innovator’s Mindset: Empower Learning, Unleash Talent, and Lead a Culture of Creativity by educator George Couros explores innovation and creativity from a teaching and learning perspective.

Expanding on Carol Dweck’s concept of growth mindset where “students understand that their talents and abilities can be developed through effort, good teaching, and persistence” (p. 32), Couros explains the innovator’s mindset as “the belief that abilities, intelligence, and talents are developed so that they lead to the creation of new and better ideas” (p. 33).

innovatorsmindset

Couros asserts that all educators should embrace an innovator’s mindset, and identifies eight key characteristics of this mindset.

“If we want innovative students, we need innovative educators.” George Couros

Throughout the book, Couros provides anecdotes, examples, and essential questions around creating a culture of innovation in learning. Each chapter closes with discussion questions that lend themselves to opportunities for conversation with colleagues and self-reflection.
Read Chapter Summaries

The Innovator’s Mindset is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL). All RDC students, staff, and faculty are invited to join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally.

Quiet Book Club
January (date tbd) from 12-1 pm
Location: tbd

The Innovator’s Mindset is part of the RDC Library Collection.
It will also soon be available for purchase in the RDC Campus Store.

Recommended Reading from RDC Library

Further Exploration

 

#InnovatorsMindset

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The Reason You Walk

April 4, 2017

“To be hurt, yet forgive. To do wrong, but forgive yourself. To depart from this world leaving only love. This is the reason you walk.” – Wab Kinew

the-reason-you-walkIn this memoir, we get a glimpse into the year that Wab Kinew spent reconnecting with his father. Through the power of story, Kinew recounts painful moments in the past and hopes for the future.

“Invoking hope, healing and forgiveness, The Reason You Walk is a poignant story of a towering but damaged father and his son as they embark on a journey to repair their family bond. By turns lighthearted and solemn, Kinew gives us an inspiring vision for family and cross-cultural reconciliation, and a wider conversation about the future of aboriginal peoples.” – Penguin Random House Canada

Read an Excerpt

Marking the month of June as Indigenous Book Club Month and in recognition of National Aboriginal History Month, we invite you to read The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew. This memoir is listed as one of CBC Books 15 Books to Read for Indigenous Book Club Month.

The Reason You Walk is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). All RDC students, staff, and faculty are invited to join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally:

Quiet Book Club
June 14, 2017 @ 12-1 pm
Location 913C (CTL)

The Reason You Walk is part of the RDC Library Collection.
It is also available for purchase in the RDC Campus Store.

Book Reviews

“A moving father-son reconciliation told by a charismatic First Nations broadcaster, musician and activist.” Read the synopsis from Penguin Random House Canada.

Recommended Reading from RDC Library

Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being

November 4, 2016

flourish“What is it that enables you to cultivate your talents, to build deep, lasting relationships with others, to feel pleasure, and to contribute meaningfully to the world? In a word, what is it that allows you to flourish?”

In Flourish, Dr. Martin Seligman, a pioneer of Positive Psychology, explores the construct of well-being. He describes that well-being theory has five measurable pillars: Happiness (or Positive Emotion), Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment. These are interwoven with topics such as grit and resilience, through personal anecdotes, case studies, and interactive exercises.

With a focus on positive education and well-being, Flourish will be of interest to learners of all ages and all disciplines.

Flourish is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). We invite all RDC students, staff, and faculty to read the book and join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally:

Quiet Book Club
January 17, 2017 from 12-1 pm
Location TBA

Flourish is part of the RDC Library Collection.
It will soon be available for purchase in the RDC Campus Store.

Recommended Reading from RDC Library

June is Indigenous Book Club Month

June 6, 2016

June is Aboriginal History Month and Indigenous Book Club Month.

Check out CBC Books’ reading list of 15 Books to Read for Indigenous Book Club Month; most of these titles are available at RDC Library:

  1. Islands of Decolonial Love by Leanne Simpson
  2. Birdie by Tracey Lindberg
  3. Celia’s Song by Lee Maracle
  4. Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson
  5. The Pemmican Eaters by Marilyn Dumont
  6. North End Love Songs by Katherena Vermette
  7. Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese
  8. The Orenda by Joseph Boyden
  9. The Lesser Blessed by Richard Van Camp
  10. The Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King
  11. Up Ghost River by Edmund Metatawabin and Alexandra Shimo (request via NEOS)
  12. Un/inhabited by Jordan Abel
  13. The Red Files by Lisa Bird­Wilson
  14. The Right to Be Cold by Sheila Watt­Cloutier
  15. The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

We invite you to join us to discuss this book at our next Quiet Book Club meeting:

June 7, 2016 from 12-1 pm
Room 1009 (The Living Room)

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America

May 12, 2016

“Most of us think history is the past. It’s Not. History is the stories we tell about the past.” – Thomas King

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North AmericaDid history happen the way we were taught it happened, or is there a different truth? The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King explores the inconsistencies in stories told behind historical events; these stories are woven into an account of his own personal experiences.

The Inconvenient Indian is an important book to read. It is one of the recommended readings that came out of a recent Red Deer workshop that explored Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). We invite you to read the book and join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally.

The Quiet Book Club
June 7, 2016 from 12-1 pm
Room 1009 (The Living Room)

The Inconvenient Indian is part of the RDC Library Collection.

Book Reviews

“The truth, as it were, lies somewhere between what is taught and what is endured by indigenous people themselves.”
Read the book review by author Richard Wagamese

“Have you ever really looked at history and the stories behind them? Do you question if these stories are fact or myth or accept them as the absolute truth? You would like to think that what you are reading in your history books is truth, but…”
Read the book review by Christine McFarlane

Recommended Reading from RDC Library