Archive for the ‘cool sites’ Category

NASA’s New Software Catalog is Here!

March 15, 2017

At the beginning of the month, NASA released its 2017-2018 software catalog. The catalog is free for the public to use without needing to worry about copyright.

“Space Wallpapers” by tableatny is licensed under CC BY 2.0

By releasing this catalog, NASA is making it easier for you to used the latest software available and currently used by the American government agency.

Not into space? Don’t leave just yet!

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Playing with Google Trends

February 9, 2017

Did you know that Google has a really cool tool that allows you to visualize trends in searches? Google Trends lets you see what stories, searches, and YouTube videos are trending right now in different areas of the world, and also lets you see how interest in different search terms have played out across time and in different regions.  It’s this tool, for instance, that let’s you compare interest in Paw Patrol versus Dora the Explorer or shows you that “searches for ‘Superb Owl’ spike during the #Superbowl each year.

If you really want to get fancy, you can pair this tool with Google Correlate, which allows you to layer your own data over Google Trends data to see how they relate (check out, for instance, how searches for influenza information correlate with actual US Center for Disease Control-reported instances of the flu).

There’s some really cool potential here.

Visualize the Spread of Fake News

January 12, 2017

A new tool developed by researchers at Indiana University allows you to visualize the spread of fake news across Twitter, and also shows attempts to fact check it.  Hoaxy lets you search for a specific claim and then creates a visual map of shares for that claim or headline over time. The researchers presented the tool, along with some preliminary analysis from it, at the 25th International Conference of the World Wide Web.

Give it a try and see what it shows you about how information, and in this case misinformation, can spread across the web.

Make Your Own Comic Strip

January 3, 2017

I was catching up on some reading over the holidays, and came across an article in Library Journal about a new Open Source Comics tool that has been released by Australia’s State Library of Queensland.  “The Fun Palaces comics maker lets users place a set of ready-made images into panels, then write their own word balloons to develop a fully fleshed out four panel comic.”

You can check out some comics other people have made, create your own comic, or dig into the code and customize it.

Just in case your new year’s resolution was to make something…

Reading @ RDC

March 15, 2016

It’s no surprise that the Library loves books, but did you know that reading can have a positive impact on your health, happiness, and academic success?

Research shows that readers will likely have higher incomes, donate more to charity in both time and money, stay healthier, and be happier than non-readers. Plus, reading reduces stress up to 600% more than playing a video game (take that Call of Duty!), enhances empathy, and improves cognitive abilities. See the research from Canada’s National Reading Campaign here, and check out the infographic below.

The Library wants all RDC staff, students & faculty to enjoy these benefits, so we’ve created a Reading Culture team to help grow a movement of leisure reading at Red Deer College. Our goal is to gather a supply of books to read just for pleasure, create a space where everyone can enjoy them, and develop an atmosphere that supports and promotes reading for fun.

So tell us, what do you want to read? The latest novel from your favourite author? An exciting new memoir? Complete this form, and your suggestions will help us create a collection that will get RDC reading!

reading infographic

 

 

Keeping Up Over the Summer

April 26, 2015

A number of cool tools have come out recently to help you stay up-to-date in your field.  Check them out:

  • BrowZine – a very cool app that allows you to read the journals RDC Library subscribes to on your mobile device. Check out the videos here, or go here to get started on your own device.
  • Sciencescape – a new tool developed by a University of Toronto grad student to help scientists keep up with what’s happening in biomedical research.  Check out the press release for this “Twitter for science” here, or take a tour here.
  • JSTOR Daily – A new online magazine from the people behind the enormous archive of scholarly articles.  Subscribe to weekly feature articles and daily blog posts in the areas of Arts & Cultures, Business & Economics, Politics & History, Science & Environment, and Education & Tech.

If you have any questions about these, or any of the other Current Awareness tools available to you through RDC Library, please contact your School Librarian.

Happy reading!

eLIFE Lens: A new ‘evolutionary’ way to view research

November 24, 2014

eLife Lens is an innovative, still experimental, new tool that will make reading articles online easier for researchers, authors, editors and readers alike. eLife Lens makes using scientific articles easier by making it possible to explore figures, figure descriptions, references and more – without losing your place in the article text. While most online research articles simply replicate print, eLife Lens takes full advantage of the Internet’s flexibility. You can absorb key elements in an important paper more readily, more quickly, and more effectively.

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Digital Public Library of America

April 19, 2013

If you’re looking to take a quick studying or marking break as final exams wind down, consider wandering over to the shiny, new Digital Public Library of America.  The site opened yesterday (a ceremony marking the event that was to be held at the Boston Public Library, the very first public library that opened in the US, was unfortunately postponed due to the Boston Marathon bombings and their aftermath) and is a remarkable partnership that is attempting to provide digital access to the collections of libraries, archives, and museums throughout the United States.

You can search the site by topic, or explore based on date, place, or exhibition.  There are also a number of apps already available, and they’re encouraging the development of more.

Have fun, but be warned – you could lose hours exploring this site!

Film History Online

November 19, 2012

Catching up on my email over the weekend, I came across a press release for a fantastic new online resource.

The Margaret Herrick Library at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has been working for the last couple of years to make part of their enormous archive available online.  The digital collections currently include Alfred Hitchcock Papers, Cecil B. DeMille Photographs, Movie Star Ephemera, and a Sheet Music Collection.

If you have a few minutes, take a quick browse.  There’s some very cool stuff for both cinematic scholars and casual movie lovers!

Crowd-sourced Cataloguing at the Bodleian Library

July 6, 2012

Have you always wanted to be a cataloguer? I know, who doesn’t? Here’s your chance to leave a mark on one of the world’s foremost libraries. The Bodleian Library at Oxford University has developed a project to have regular folks describe a collection of 4300 Victorian music scores for piano. They hope that this project will open the door to having other collections catalogued by the public.

Don’t panic if you’re not sure how to describe a musical score – there’s an extensive Guidelines section to help.

Want to participate? Check it out at http://www.whats-the-score.org.

The project is hosted by Zooniverse.org – another cool spot to participate in world-wide, crowd-sourced projects. You could help researchers understand how whales communicate, search the Milky Way for data on how stars form, or study the lives of Ancient Greeks. Perfect rainy day summer projects!