Archive for the ‘open access’ Category

Open Education Week

March 27, 2017

banner_865x180

Happy Open Education Week! From March 27 to March 31, 2017 universities, colleges, schools and organizations around the world will be celebrating Open Education Week.

“Open education encompasses resources, tools and practices that employ a framework of open sharing to improve educational access and effectiveness worldwide.”

Many events are taking place locally and globally to promote the ideas of Open Education. The following free events may be of interest:

March 29, 2017

Successful OER Adoption Models: Academic Libraries Leading the Way
2017-03-29 12:00 pm ONLINE EVENT
SPARC

March 30, 2017

Integrating OER: Tips for Getting Started
2017-03-30 09:00 am ONLINE EVENT
Northern Virginia Community College

Be It Resolved That All Knowledge Be Open
2017-03-30 12:30 pm IN-PERSON EVENT
University of Alberta, Cameron Library

Introduction to Open Pedagogy
2017-03-30 13:00 pm ONLINE EVENT
University of Saskatchewan

March 31, 2017

OER Google Hangout
2017-03-31 10:00 am ONLINE EVENT
Northern Virginia Community College

(more…)

Advertisements

NASA’s New Software Catalog is Here!

March 15, 2017

At the beginning of the month, NASA released its 2017-2018 software catalog. The catalog is free for the public to use without needing to worry about copyright.

“Space Wallpapers” by tableatny is licensed under CC BY 2.0

By releasing this catalog, NASA is making it easier for you to used the latest software available and currently used by the American government agency.

Not into space? Don’t leave just yet!

(more…)

Need Images for a Project or Class? These Ones are Free!

February 16, 2017

Did you know not every cute cat gif or perfectly relevant meme you find on the internet is free for you to use whenever you want? Technically someone owns the copyright to those images and might not want you to share their work without permission or sometimes even payment.

But…

Creative Commons recently launched a prototype of its new search engine, CC Search, which which will assist you in finding images that are free for you to use without having to ask for permission or pay the creator. (more…)

New Books in JSTOR

November 1, 2016

Just in time for Open Access Week last week, JSTOR announced a new program to make Open Access ebooks available on the JSTOR platform.

The initial list of 63 titles covers topics from Bach Fugues to Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.  My favourite: The Resonance of Unseen Things: Poetics, Power, Captivity, and UFOs in the American Uncanny.

Happy reading!

Open Access Week: Oct. 24-30, 2016

October 25, 2016

Open Access Week is here!

This international event celebrates publishing initiatives that make scholarly research accessible online to anyone, anytime, anywhere in the world.

The theme of this year’s Open Access Week is “Open in Action.” Everyone from institutions to scholars are being encouraged to move beyond discussing the concept of Open Access, to putting it into practice.

Whether you are a faculty member looking to make your research more accessible to everyone or, you are a student interested in research that is freely available once you are finished your program, Open Access may be of interest to you.

Learn more!

Interested in learning more about Open Access?  Check out these brief handouts on Open Access from the International Open Access Week website:

Also, visit the Open Access section of Red Deer College’s Research Common website.

Libraries, Archives & Museums world-wide contribute to Shared Shelf Commons

December 9, 2014

What is Shared Shelf Commons? It is a free, open-access library of images and multimedia files, developed and hosted by Artstor. Search and browse collections with tools to zoom, print, export, and share images.

An impressive number of images ranging from great works of art from world-famous galleries and museum collections to bookplates donated to library Special Collections can be found in Shared Shelf Commons (SSC). In addition to images, SSC currently has over 170,000 multimedia files, including streaming video and streaming audio, that are freely available to the global community. For example, this silent film travelogue documentary provides a glimpse into the past: Travelogues: Washington, DC

android-smartphone-image620x440 copy

Shared Shelf Commons also has a mobile site where Apple and Android device users can search, browse, and view images. SSC mobile is open to anyone with a mobile device – it is not necessary to have an account. Access the site with your mobile device.

Welcome to Shared Shelf Commons!

Celebrate Open Access Week October 21-27

October 21, 2013

Open Access Week October 21-27, 2013October 21-27 is Open Access Week

Open Access Week is an international event that promotes Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research.

This international event recognizes and promotes publishing initiatives that make scholarly research accessible online to anyone, anytime, anywhere in the world.

This is accomplished through Open Access (OA) journals, institutional repositories, self-archiving and a lot of hard work by academics, librarians and a variety of others who argue that free, universal access to research is a right, not a pricey privilege.

Open Access Webcasts

In celebration of Open Access Week, Athabasca University is presenting a series of free noon hour webcasts exploring major issues and opportunities of Open Access and Open Educational Resources. Topics include:

  • the state of the art in the distribution of e-textbooks;
  • open access books in the K12 schools of Brazil;
  • the open access situation in Canada;
  • MOOCs and the open access movement;
  • the OER university initiative; and
  • other issues relating to Open Access internationally

For more information and links to the webcasts, visit:
Webcast Link Free Noon Hour Webcasts Schedule

Open Access Live Stream Events

Watch Open Access events live streamed from around the globe.

For more information and links to the live stream, visit:
Webcast Link Live Stream Events Schedule

Learn More

Visit the RDC Library Open Resources guide to learn more about Open Access, Open Education Resources, and Open Culture.

Ask Me About Open Access

OA in the USA

February 27, 2013

Research funded by US taxpayers must be made available to the American public for free within a year of publication, as outlined in a recent article published on Inside Higher Ed.  In addition to posting the research itself, this new legislation requires publishing bodies to post metadata –  including relevant information related to the research –  so it will be discoverable through search engines. In Canada, depending on the funding body, the rules can be similar. For example,  starting January 2013, publications receiving funding through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research are required to make their peer-reviewed research publicly available within 12 months of publication (see here).  One more step down the road toward Open Access.  And, thinking practically about all of this, in a time of fiscal uncertainty, should taxpayers really be paying twice for access to important (government-funded) research?

New Ideas in the World of Peer Review

November 7, 2012

Peer review has long been a standard measure of credibility for academic articles.  However, the system has also long been criticized for a variety of reasons, including the length of time it takes for research to be published.

An article in Inside Higher Ed last week highlighted a couple of new ventures in the world of peer review aimed at speeding up the process and opening it up to more people. (more…)

Open Access Week

October 25, 2011

Open Access WeekOctober 24-30 is Open Access Week!

Visit our Open Guide to learn about Open Access, Open Culture, Open Education, and Open Source.

This international event recognizes and promotes publishing initiatives that make scholarly research accessible online to anyone, anytime, anywhere in the world.

This is accomplished through Open Access (OA) journals, institutional repositories, self-archiving and a lot of hard work by academics, librarians and a variety of others who argue that free, universal access to research is a right, not a pricey privilege.

The following animated video (3:16) explains open access to research and why it’s important: