Archive for the ‘uncategorized’ Category

The Reason You Walk

April 4, 2017

“To be hurt, yet forgive. To do wrong, but forgive yourself. To depart from this world leaving only love. This is the reason you walk.” – Wab Kinew

the-reason-you-walkIn this memoir, we get a glimpse into the year that Wab Kinew spent reconnecting with his father. Through the power of story, Kinew recounts painful moments in the past and hopes for the future.

“Invoking hope, healing and forgiveness, The Reason You Walk is a poignant story of a towering but damaged father and his son as they embark on a journey to repair their family bond. By turns lighthearted and solemn, Kinew gives us an inspiring vision for family and cross-cultural reconciliation, and a wider conversation about the future of aboriginal peoples.” – Penguin Random House Canada

Read an Excerpt

Marking the month of June as Indigenous Book Club Month and in recognition of National Aboriginal History Month, we invite you to read The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew. This memoir is listed as one of CBC Books 15 Books to Read for Indigenous Book Club Month.

The Reason You Walk is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). All RDC students, staff, and faculty are invited to join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally:

Quiet Book Club
June 14, 2017 @ 12-1 pm
Location 913C (CTL)

The Reason You Walk is part of the RDC Library Collection.
It is also available for purchase in the RDC Campus Store.

Book Reviews

“A moving father-son reconciliation told by a charismatic First Nations broadcaster, musician and activist.” Read the synopsis from Penguin Random House Canada.

Recommended Reading from RDC Library

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Fake News – Can You Recognize It?

November 29, 2016

With all the news surrounding the spread of fake news, it’s hard to avoid the subject. Facebook has been under scrutiny for the spread of fake news on the site, which has prompted a plan to cut down on the amount of fake news the site hosts. It seems that fake news is easy to write and send out to millions of eager readers every day, but are you prepared to spot the real from the fake?

A study recently conducted by Stanford History Education Project provides evidence that not very many of us are able to spot the fake! The study tested students in high schools and universities across the United States and found that a majority of students are not able to detect fake news on social media and news websites.

Think you can do better than the students who were tested? Take a look at the examples provided in the study and see if you get them right!

If you need a refresher on how to evaluate what you’re reading online, take a look at our Research Guide for tips to guide you on your search for reliable information.

Good luck out there and happy reading!

New Leisure Reading Collection coming together

August 15, 2016

File_000 (3)In March we told you about our Reading Culture task team and the scientifically proven benefits of reading, and invited you to submit suggestions for books you’d like to see included in our new Leisure Reading Collection. We heard from a LOT of you, and we’ve ordered several new books.

The Leisure Reading Collection will be on Floor 2 near the elevators. We’ve placed some comfortable furniture in the space and have relocated our paperback collection there. Some spiffy new shelving units have been ordered for all the new books that are arriving daily. In the meantime, borrow a paperback or check out one of the brand new books which are currently on display near our Library Desk.

It’s not too late to suggest titles for this collection; use this form if you’d like to do that.

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June is Indigenous Book Club Month

June 6, 2016

June is Aboriginal History Month and Indigenous Book Club Month.

Check out CBC Books’ reading list of 15 Books to Read for Indigenous Book Club Month; most of these titles are available at RDC Library:

  1. Islands of Decolonial Love by Leanne Simpson
  2. Birdie by Tracey Lindberg
  3. Celia’s Song by Lee Maracle
  4. Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson
  5. The Pemmican Eaters by Marilyn Dumont
  6. North End Love Songs by Katherena Vermette
  7. Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese
  8. The Orenda by Joseph Boyden
  9. The Lesser Blessed by Richard Van Camp
  10. The Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King
  11. Up Ghost River by Edmund Metatawabin and Alexandra Shimo (request via NEOS)
  12. Un/inhabited by Jordan Abel
  13. The Red Files by Lisa Bird­Wilson
  14. The Right to Be Cold by Sheila Watt­Cloutier
  15. The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

We invite you to join us to discuss this book at our next Quiet Book Club meeting:

June 7, 2016 from 12-1 pm
Room 1009 (The Living Room)

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America

May 12, 2016

“Most of us think history is the past. It’s Not. History is the stories we tell about the past.” – Thomas King

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North AmericaDid history happen the way we were taught it happened, or is there a different truth? The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King explores the inconsistencies in stories told behind historical events; these stories are woven into an account of his own personal experiences.

The Inconvenient Indian is an important book to read. It is one of the recommended readings that came out of a recent Red Deer workshop that explored Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). We invite you to read the book and join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally.

The Quiet Book Club
June 7, 2016 from 12-1 pm
Room 1009 (The Living Room)

The Inconvenient Indian is part of the RDC Library Collection.

Book Reviews

“The truth, as it were, lies somewhere between what is taught and what is endured by indigenous people themselves.”
Read the book review by author Richard Wagamese

“Have you ever really looked at history and the stories behind them? Do you question if these stories are fact or myth or accept them as the absolute truth? You would like to think that what you are reading in your history books is truth, but…”
Read the book review by Christine McFarlane

Recommended Reading from RDC Library

Open Education Week

March 7, 2016

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From March 7 to March 11, 2016 universities, colleges, schools and organizations around the world will be celebrating Open Education Week:

“Open Education Week’s goal is to raise awareness about free and open educational opportunities that exist for everyone, everywhere, right now.”

Many events have been scheduled locally and globally to promote the ideas of Open Education. The following free Canadian online events may be of interest:

 

View the Open Education Fact Sheet (PDF) from the Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) for more information about Open Education, including Open Educational Resources (OERs) and Open Access (OA).

View the RDC Library Open Guide to find open education tools and resources.

Student Book Review: What We Saw

March 1, 2016

autumn

Autumn Chrunik is RDC Library’s student book blogger. She’s an avid reader (a huge bookworm!), who hopes to become an author someday. Until then she wants to study literature and literary writing, as well as publishing. Other than reading, she enjoys writing and hanging out with her friends and family. You can find Autumn on Twitter @AutumnChrunik or check out her blog For Those Who Read at Night.  Interested in being a student book blogger? Email: mary.medinsky@rdc.ab.ca

REVIEW: What We Saw By Kate Weston

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Synopsis (from my hardback cover)-

Kate Weston can piece together most of the bash at John Doone’s house: shots with Stacey Stallard, Ben Cody taking her keys and getting her home early, the feeling that maybe he’s becoming more than just the guy she’s known since they were kids.

But when a picture of Stacey passed out over Deacon Mills’s shoulder appears online the next morning, Kate suspects she doesn’t have all the details, and begins asking questions.

What really happened at the party after she left? Who was still there? What did they see?

When Stacey levels charges against four of Kate’s classmates, the whole town erupts into controversy. Facts that can’t be ignored begin to surface, and every answer Kate finds leads back to the same question: Where was Ben when a terrible crime was committed?

This story—inspired by real events—from debut novelist Aaron Hartzler takes an unflinching look at silence as a form of complicity. It’s a book about the high stakes of speaking up, and the razor thin line between guilt and innocence that so often gets blurred, one hundred and forty characters at a time.

My Thoughts:

*Trigger Warning: Rape

This book was so powerful! The decision that Kate Weston, the main character, has to make is really difficult: find out what really happened the night of the party when Stacey Stallard was assaulted, and tell, or stop asking questions. It’s a decision that Kate refuses to let go, especially when it might have to do with her new boyfriend Ben. All she can think about is what happened to Stacey, and where was Ben that night? Kate stops at nothing to find out the truth, no matter the consequences. The only problem is, is she willing to tell the police the truth as well, to do the right thing for Stacey, but potentially harm Ben in the process?

I really liked that the story had no happy ending. No one was going to be able to move on from the night of the party, and what happened to Stacey, whether the truth got told or not.This book also sheds light on the topic of rape, consent, and slut-shaming. I think this is such an important aspect of the book because it doesn’t get sugarcoated at all. This is an issue that needs to be discussed about more often, and the fact that we are seeing it more and more in literature is very important.

This book also sheds light on the topic of rape, consent, and slut-shaming. I think this is such an important aspect of the book because it doesn’t get sugarcoated at all. This is an issue that needs to be discussed about more often, and the fact that we are seeing it more and more in literature is very important.

With all of this being said I give this book, 5/5 stars! I think this is a book that everyone should pick up, so I highly recommend it.

Want to read this book? Request it using The Alberta Library. 

Book Blogger Autumn is Back!

February 3, 2016

autumn

Autumn Chrunik is RDC Library’s student book blogger. She’s an avid reader (a huge bookworm!), who hopes to become an author someday. Until then she wants to study literature and literary writing, as well as publishing. Other than reading, she enjoys writing and hanging out with her friends and family. You can find Autumn on Twitter @AutumnChrunik or check out her blog For Those Who Read at Night.  Interested in being a student book blogger? Email: mary.medinsky@rdc.ab.ca

REVIEW: Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

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Synopsis (from my paperback cover)-

Nimona is an impulsive young shapeshifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren’t the heroes everyone thinks they are.

Nemeses! Dragons! Science! Symbolism! All these and more await in this brilliantly subversive, sharply irreverent epic from Noelle Stevenson, based on her award-winning web comic.

My Thoughts:

Plot- Even though this novel focuses on villains as main characters, you can easily tell that the plot isn’t really about these said villains trying to take over the world, but to prove that this popular company in their kingdom isn’t actually doing the good things that it says its doing. The villains do have a very evil personality to them at first, however, but as the story progresses you see that they are a very loving and forgiving people.

Characters- I loved the two main characters, Nimona and Blackheart. Nimona is just a young girl who has this amazing ability to shape shift of free will. She does not, however, have a family to look out for her. Blackheart proves to be that parent figure in her life that Nimona does not have. He truly loves and cares for Nimona, which really made this story for me.

Setting- It was set in a sort of medieval time, but with dragons and magic. It was very cool to look at.

 Art Style- I really liked the art style! It was a really fun way to help tell the story! The characters’ emotions were well drawn out on their faces, and there was quite a bit of details on each picture on each page. Very well done!

 Overall- Overall I give this graphic novel 5/5 stars! It was so cute and I loved how caring and forgiving all the characters were! Plus, the drawings are very well done and they really give you a sense of what the world looks like, and what is going on in the story. I would definitely recommend this for people of all ages! It’s a very quick and enjoyable read.

Want to read this book? Request it using The Alberta Library. 

 

The Dog Eared Review of ‘Station Eleven’ by Emily St. John Mandel

December 27, 2015

“Because Survival is Insufficient” – Seven of Nine (Star Trek Voyager)

Station Eleven is the award winning, fourth novel of Canadian author Emily St. John Mandel. While the many awards the book has won should be enough to entice me to read and review, my real reasoning was it is the inaugural book for the community wide book club, Red Deer Reads. I had started this review several months ago but thanks to a heavy semester was unable to finish it until now.

Set within a dystopian background, Station Eleven quickly reveals the propensity for keeping this reader captivated beyond her usual bed time. Having been drawn to post-apocalyptic narratives for as long as I can remember, I happily found the exploration of human intimacy and personal interactions within Ms. St. John Mandel’s novel to be opposite of the expected decay of character and environment as often happens within this type of tale. Station Eleven

Spanning several decades, the novel exhibits the author’s talent in connecting not only people with each other but surrounding events as well; a clarity of time kept clear rather than becoming muddled in the changing intervals. With clever word play, that would make the Bard himself proud, the author invites the reader to keep guessing until the end about the connectivity the characters all share. With the continual development of the characters, throughout the entirety of the novel, an attachment of sorts is created; with some character’s charm endearing them to the reader while the possibility of death for others elicits silent encouragement.

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Open Access Week: Oct. 19-25, 2015

October 21, 2015

Open Access Week is here! Open Access 2015

This international event celebrates publishing initiatives that make scholarly research accessible online to anyone, anytime, anywhere in the world.

This is accomplished through Open Access (OA) journals, institutional repositories, self-archiving and a lot of hard work by academics, librarians and a variety of others who believe in free, universal access to research.

The theme of this year’s Open Access Week is “Open for Collaboration.”  In the spirit of the theme of collaboration events such as the “Wikipedia Open Access Week Edit-a-thon” will be taking place.

Learn more!

Interested in learning more about Open Access? Check out the below videos.  You can also vist the RDC Library Open guide to learn more about Open Access (OA), Open Education Resources (OER), and Open Culture.

by the Right to Research Coalition

by Nick Shockey and Jonathan Eisen