“I suggested a book, what happens next?”

December 15, 2016 by

We launched our Leisure Reading Collection in May, but that was just the beginning! Since then, we have continued to ask for and receive book suggestions from students, staff, and faculty.

But how do we decide which suggestions are added to the collection? Below is a peek into our vetting process which may give you insight into why some books made it to our shelve and why others didn’t.

First, most suggestions DO get added! Some recent additions include:

If we have more suggestions than our budget allows, those titles are given priority next time we place an order, which was the case for Sense and sensibility and sea monsters by Ben Winters and Alliance of equals by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller.

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Fake News – Can You Recognize It?

November 29, 2016 by

With all the news surrounding the spread of fake news, it’s hard to avoid the subject. Facebook has been under scrutiny for the spread of fake news on the site, which has prompted a plan to cut down on the amount of fake news the site hosts. It seems that fake news is easy to write and send out to millions of eager readers every day, but are you prepared to spot the real from the fake?

A study recently conducted by Stanford History Education Project provides evidence that not very many of us are able to spot the fake! The study tested students in high schools and universities across the United States and found that a majority of students are not able to detect fake news on social media and news websites.

Think you can do better than the students who were tested? Take a look at the examples provided in the study and see if you get them right!

If you need a refresher on how to evaluate what you’re reading online, take a look at our Research Guide for tips to guide you on your search for reliable information.

Good luck out there and happy reading!

Judging Books by their Covers

November 17, 2016 by

An article published last week in MIT Technology Review reported on research being done in Japan to see if a computer can recognize the genre of a book based on its cover.  The researchers are training a neural network to “recognize the correlation between cover design and genre” and then testing it to see how it does categorizing newly introduced covers.  The findings so far are very interesting, including which genres were easier to recognize and which cover designs confused the network.

The article got me thinking about what makes a good book cover.  For some thoughts, check out this profile of a highly-respected book jacket designer, and then take a look at this funny essay from a writer who designed his own most recent book jacket.

Just want to look at some pretty covers? Shortlist Magazine created a list of what they consider to be the 50 Coolest Book Covers, and the New York Times created a list of the Best Book Covers of 2015.

Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being

November 4, 2016 by

flourish“What is it that enables you to cultivate your talents, to build deep, lasting relationships with others, to feel pleasure, and to contribute meaningfully to the world? In a word, what is it that allows you to flourish?”

In Flourish, Dr. Martin Seligman, a pioneer of Positive Psychology, explores the construct of well-being. He describes that well-being theory has five measurable pillars: Happiness (or Positive Emotion), Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment. These are interwoven with topics such as grit and resilience, through personal anecdotes, case studies, and interactive exercises.

With a focus on positive education and well-being, Flourish will be of interest to learners of all ages and all disciplines.

Flourish is the current selection for the Quiet Book Club, an initiative of the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). We invite all RDC students, staff, and faculty to read the book and join us at our next meeting to share how the book has impacted you personally or professionally:

Quiet Book Club
January 17, 2017 from 12-1 pm
Location TBA

Flourish is part of the RDC Library Collection.
It will soon be available for purchase in the RDC Campus Store.

Recommended Reading from RDC Library

New Books in JSTOR

November 1, 2016 by

Just in time for Open Access Week last week, JSTOR announced a new program to make Open Access ebooks available on the JSTOR platform.

The initial list of 63 titles covers topics from Bach Fugues to Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.  My favourite: The Resonance of Unseen Things: Poetics, Power, Captivity, and UFOs in the American Uncanny.

Happy reading!

You Said “It’s Too Noisy in the Library!”

October 27, 2016 by

We received two comments this week regarding noise in the Library. You Said:

“You need to get people to work quietly to facilitate a good productive study environment. It sounds like a a cafeteria rather than a place of study and it is very frustrating to students that want to study. This is the loudest college Library I have ever seen. It makes the college look poorly. Maybey some signs would help? [sic]”

You also said:

“The library is misused by most students. It appears and sounds like a local pub… noise to excess, groups are socializing and extremely loud and can be heard in all portions of the facility even the upstairs quiet study area, no rule enforcement …. RDC library is disgrace for students who actually come to the library fo its intended use….R [sic]”

We Said:

Thank you for the comments about the noise levels in the Library.

The Library Information Common serves many purposes on campus, including providing space for collaborative work and social activities. This definition of an Information Common may help to clarify: “a place that has a serious learning function, supported by information and technology resources, but in a setting that can be noisy and readily accepts group activities.”

While our open architecture has many benefits, one of the drawbacks is that sound carries easily between floors. We have identified this issue to be considered in potential future renovations, but there is no immediate fix for this problem.

As you may know, we tolerate a certain level of group interaction and noise, and we have provided signage in the Quiet Area on floor 2. If there is excessive noise in the Quiet Area, please speak to the offending group or approach a staff member who will intervene on your behalf. Our staff can be reached in person at the Library Desk, by text at 403-800-8945, by live chat via the library website or any of our subject guides, or by phone at 403-342-3344.

You may want to try our Quiet Individual Study Room, 2006J, which has extra soundproofing insulation and a white noise machine.

Open Access Week: Oct. 24-30, 2016

October 25, 2016 by

Open Access Week is here!

This international event celebrates publishing initiatives that make scholarly research accessible online to anyone, anytime, anywhere in the world.

The theme of this year’s Open Access Week is “Open in Action.” Everyone from institutions to scholars are being encouraged to move beyond discussing the concept of Open Access, to putting it into practice.

Whether you are a faculty member looking to make your research more accessible to everyone or, you are a student interested in research that is freely available once you are finished your program, Open Access may be of interest to you.

Learn more!

Interested in learning more about Open Access?  Check out these brief handouts on Open Access from the International Open Access Week website:

Also, visit the Open Access section of Red Deer College’s Research Common website.

Blackboard: there’s a NEW app for that

October 24, 2016 by

Bb Student appBb Student is Blackboard’s new mobile app that enables students to learn on their own mobile device. The simple interface allows students to access course content, complete assignments, view announcements, take tests, and check grades.

Navigation is intuitive with the most relevant features grouped and categorized in one place. The majority of students will spend their time in the main Activity Stream, which is the app’s home screen. It represents a “smart view” of prioritized events and due dates.

View, complete, and submit assignments and tests right in the app. Engage in real-time collaboration with your instructor and other students.

Bb Student is available on the App Store, Google Play, and on the Windows Store.

For more information or help using the new Bb Student app or Blackboard, visit RDC Library’s Blackboard guide or see us in person at the Library Desk.

When we say you can cite anything…we mean it!

October 3, 2016 by

If you’ve ever thought about using a source in your writing, but decided against it because you were unsure how you would cite it, don’t worry!

The Modern Language Association (MLA) recently updated its citation style guide, which has caused quite a stir in the academic community. In order to help demonstrate the changes and how they reflect some of the new types of resources researchers will cite in their work, EasyBib has decided to show us how easy it is to cite Pokemon GO using the new MLA standard. Read the rest of this entry »

Light therapy lamps available for student use

September 23, 2016 by

Light therapy lamps, or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) Lamps, mimic outdoor natural light. Late fall and winter months in Canada tend to lack sunshine, which can affect individuals in different ways, including lowering mood, decreasing energy and over-sleeping.

light therapy lamps available at RDC libraryExposure to light that mimics sunlight is believed to alter brain chemicals that moderate mood, helping to relieve feelings of fatigue, anxiety, low mood, and loss of motivation that can commonly occur during the winter months. In as little as 20-30 minutes a day, symptoms can be relieved by using light therapy.

The Students’ Association of RDC has provided two light therapy lamps for use by RDC students. The lamps are available for 2-hour loan from RDC Library, for use anywhere on campus.

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